Stadiums & Shrines


Tomorrow Was The Golden Age, a sublime flight—among our very favorites this past year—was for some (including us) an introduction to Bing & Ruth. While David Moore & friends had provided a proper entry point five years earlier. Quietly self-released at the time, City Lake will now see a newly mastered and expanded run this fall via RVNG Intl. The work of an eleven-piece ensemble, this debut album has a more physical (while no less transcendent) feel compared to its successor.

The bright, astir “Rails” presents Moore at piano, underscored by strings, horns and hand-claps. Its accompanying visual, directed by Seba Cros, captures the contemplative trance of train ride, with the outside world flickering alongside.

City Lake is out November 13th, before a string of live dates revisiting the material. Suggested places to go from here: a dream, and a cliffside performance at FORM Arcosanti.

Mother In Comet


“Mother in Comet” first appeared in a dream, framing ‘teary eyes in the twilight’ of an English countryside. A year later, the melancholic instrumental receives a stunning treatment here that both compliments the previous scene and invents another entirely. Director and longtime Gem Club collaborator BriAnna Olson kindly provided some words:

“Processing meaning is such a personal practice, and Christopher’s music has a way of feeling both deeply personal and profoundly supernal. He can run circles around a single moment the way a thinking mind replays an event trying to process its meaning. He’s extracting and uncovering… it feels beautiful… it feels tragic… it feels private. That’s where this video piece came from… it is an anamnesis, a revelatory moment suspended it time, where it is absolute and ever-changing.”

Christopher Barnes of Gem Club, added:

“When BriAnna sent me her idea for the Mother in Comet video I was reminded of the examination in a doctor’s office where a ray of light is shined into your pupil–a series of lenses flash in front of your eye–in order to observe the reflex off the retina. Or perhaps an earlier memory of being a child, eyes closed and holding a flashlight up to my eyelid. The warmth of the bulb, the bright glare of white light against pink.

The visual sense depends entirely on reflected light. Objects in our environment reflect light which enters our eye, forms an image, and transmits information to our brain for processing. Vision occurs when this image is electrically transmitted to the brain for analysis and response. BriAnna’s work suggests this process for me—as a visual representation of how the eye captures an image, or how our brain translates an image into a memory.”

2014 LP In Roses is available on Hardly Art. And soon the band will perform with Lower Dens in Christopher’s hometown of Portsmouth, NH.

I Don't Know


At first, “I Don’t Know” is in psychedelic freefall, chugging through fuzz without any real desire to develop further. Then it finds a signal, this station of temporary clarity… in come some vocals, back comes the static over top—it’s all quite nice.

Ulrika Spacek formed in Berlin and are now based in Homerton, London. Details beyond that, have yet to enter this newly registered SoundCloud.

Noah Wall


Rise and shine; print three dimensional objects and bury them in the yard…

Standard day here for Noah Wall, designer of sounds and images and clever ideas of all kinds, like this video. Featured are two vignettes from his latest release, Print The Legend, a collection of material left behind after soundtracking a Netflix documentary about the 3D printing industry. These recordings are brief, curious and flexible, as if themselves able to take new shape with every spin. That dynamic is well supported by the album’s cover art. Noah recently told Redefine:

“The collage is made of 3D printing models taken from a primarily open source library. I wanted to use enough models that the individual pieces started to lose their identity, sort of a Wild West depiction of the 3D printing landscape. Also many types. Toys, tools, weapons, organs, plants, naked people, animals, lawn gnomes. Utilities and recreations. I got my head 3D scanned, so that’s in there too. I think the whole thing is beautiful and much like a giant pile of garbage painted blue too. The music is rather varied genre and instrumentation-wise, so I think it fits.”

Natural then—following all this, the music, the printing of one’s own head—that these elements would start moving. First over a set of brilliant Instagram teasers, next through a stack of index card storyboards, and finally today, with “Closed Source & Hot Glue.”

Print The Legend is out now via Driftless Recordings.



An oddly hypnotic, almost vaudevillian surveillance here, watching anxieties rise and shake to the trembling notes of a piano. It’s all very brief and effective, the work of musician and visual artist Celia Hollander (who’s also responsible for one of last year’s most fascinating albums). The excerpt is from the opening track to DRAFT, a collection of piano-based sketches.

Find the rest at bandcamp.